Bob Dluzen

Bob Dluzen

As a result of being a gardener for more than 40 years, 30 of those as a professional, Bob's gardening has become an integral part of his life. "It's the ever-changing seasons and the wide variety of plants and gardens that keeps me intrigued," he says. Bob lives and gardens in rural Monroe County.

Lupine seedpods maturing indoors

I was a bit startled the other day just as I was putting on my coat getting ready to go outside. It was quiet in the house and I was the only one home. All of a sudden I heard a snap and the clickety-clack of what sounded like small beads landing on the table … Continue Reading →

Canada geese love rye grain

One of the best things you can do for your garden is to plant winter rye; the same crop that farmers grow for flour that eventually gets made into rye bread. Last year at this time I wrote a couple of posts about how to sow rye. You can scroll back and find those posts … Continue Reading →

Painted lady butterflies in abundance

Just about everyone knows what a monarch butterfly is and about its amazing migration to and from Mexico. But not nearly as many people have even heard of a painted lady butterfly; until this year that is. Reports of painted lady butterflies were all over the twittersphere last week. The most popular one I saw … Continue Reading →

Three impressive tomato vatieties

Earlier in this past growing season, I took an informal survey of how a number of tomato varieties were responding to leaf spot diseases. You can go back and read the post to find out how things were going for them at that time. I kept an eye on them through the season and watched … Continue Reading →

The remarkable salvia flower

You can find some really amazing things in the garden if you know where to look. For example, look closely at a salvia flower and you will see something unique. Like most flowers, salvia produces nectar to lure pollinators such as wild bees, honeybees and others. And as usual, the pollinator ends up carrying pollen … Continue Reading →

Sweezeweed in the garden

We were sitting out on the porch earlier this week enjoying that summery weather.  One flower caught my eye, it was fresh and bright among the others that were either gone or fading fast. It was one we forgot that we had planted this spring it was sneezeweed. Sneezeweed, also referred to as Helenium  by … Continue Reading →

Autumn dogbane

When I was around 10 years old, back when all kids were free-range, I spotted spotted a plant during my wanderings that impressed me so much that I’m intrigued by it to this day. I didn’t know what it was called at the time. It wasn’t until later, when I was in college, that I … Continue Reading →

Lots of spots on maple tree

In many cases, diagnosing plant problems requires an in-person look at the plant in question. Too many disorders look similar when all you have is a photo to go by. Earlier this week someone sent me a photo asking about spots on a valuable tree they have in their front lawn. That was an easy … Continue Reading →

Keep an eye on your grapes

According to my records, my grapes are about 10 days ahead of last year at this date. Every growing season is different and any particular year doesn’t necessarily line up with seasonal average growing conditions. Ten days is a long time when it comes to grapes. I covered the grapes with netting last week to … Continue Reading →

Sycamore trees losing leaves

The stretch of dry weather we had took its toll on some sycamore trees planted in a less than ideal spot this season. Although sycamores can grow in dry areas, they thrive in moist soils. That causes a bit of a problem since the best spot to build a structure is on a high and … Continue Reading →