Gardening

This spring is shaping up to be a good one for growing peas

Many years, I don’t even bother planting peas.  More often than not,  the spring weather around here is just too warm to grow much of a crop.

Peas need cool growing temperatures to grow, otherwise if the temperature gets too high, they just quit growing and never produce. That goes for all types of peas: shelling peas, snow peas and snap peas.

Shell peas are the type of peas we buy in the frozen food department. Those have already been shelled from their pea pods and quick frozen.

Snow peas are the flat-podded peas used in Chinese cooking. Snow peas are harvested while the pods are still quite flat and the peas inside are just beginning to swell.

Snap peas have edible pods too but they are not snow peas. They are harvested and eaten much like a green bean, when the peas are larger but still tender.

This spring is shaping up to be a good pea growing year. I plan to get an extra large spot planted just  as soon as the soil temperature warms up to 45 degrees F.

Pea seeds are sold either treated or untreated. Treated seeds are dyed a bright color. The treatment helps prevent the seeds from rotting in cold damp soil.

Although most pea seeds are sold untreated, sometimes they are available as treated seeds. Treated seeds are dyed a bright color. The treatment helps prevent the seeds from rotting in cold damp soil.

You might want to try planting peas this spring too. You just might end up with enough peas to make a meal or two with some left over for freezing.

By the way, sweet peas — the flowering plant — are not edible. They belong to an entirely different genus than edible peas.

Bob Dluzen
As a result of being a gardener for more than 40 years, 30 of those as a professional, Bob's gardening has become an integral part of his life. "It's the ever-changing seasons and the wide variety of plants and gardens that keeps me intrigued," he says. Bob lives and gardens in rural Monroe County.