Gardening

Grow horseradish

Horseradish is one of my favorite condiments.

These hot and spicy roots are in an entirely different category compared to hot pepper sauce. I know people who have no problem with the hottest pepper sauce but can’t seem to handle the pungency of fresh horseradish. Maybe it’s because the active ingredient in hot peppers is capsicum, while in horseradish it is mustard oil.

As it turns out, horseradish is a pretty simple herb to grow and is not picky about soil. Of course, like most other plants, the better the garden soil, the larger the yield. Once you get it going, it pretty much takes care of itself.

Right now, is the time to get your horseradish started.

Even though seed is sometimes available, nearly all horseradish is planted by root cuttings. Place the root cuttings at an angle in a shallow trench. Cover them with about an inch of soil. Keep the young plants watered during any dry spells.

 

Horseradish root cuttings must be planted right end up. The top is cut straight across while the bottom has a diagonal cut.

Horseradish root cuttings must be planted right end up. The top is cut straight across while the bottom has a diagonal cut.

Although I’ve heard of many instances of horseradish getting out control and taking over an area, I’ve never had that problem. The plants can easily reach a height of 2 feet or more. Two or three plants are enough for most households.

Horseradish roots are harvested during the fall after the first hard freeze. I prepare horseradish the same way most folks do, by grating the roots and mixing it with vinegar.

 

 

 

 

Bob Dluzen
As a result of being a gardener for more than 40 years, 30 of those as a professional, Bob's gardening has become an integral part of his life. "It's the ever-changing seasons and the wide variety of plants and gardens that keeps me intrigued," he says. Bob lives and gardens in rural Monroe County.